Ethical Engagement Rings

rose cut canadian diamonds from dream diam

Bagues de fiançailles éthiques : #Diamantcanadien #CanadianDiamonds

Nos clients nous demandent fréquemment d’où proviennent nos diamants. C’est une question lourde de sens, mais tout à fait pertinente quand on connaît le tort que l’extraction de diamants peut causer aux hommes et à l’environnement. C’est aussi pourquoi nous sortons des sentiers battus lorsque nous nous procurons nos pierres précieuses.

Si vous pouviez survoler la mine de diamants Diavik, dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest, vous y verriez un spectaculaire cratère octogonal, aussi large qu’une île et encerclé par les froides eaux bleues de l’océan. Ses parois en gradins vous donneraient l’impression de pouvoir descendre tranquillement jusqu’au centre de la Terre pour y choisir le diamant de vos rêves. Tout comme les autres mines de diamants canadiennes, Diavik se conforme à de strictes réglementations. Des fonds ont par exemple été prévus pour garantir la restauration du site exploité. De plus, la mine offre son soutien à de multiples entreprises autochtones et collabore étroitement avec les communautés locales pour minimiser ses répercussions négatives sur le territoire et les gens qui l’habitent.

Les diamants canadiens nous permettent de répondre à notre désir – et à celui de nos clients! – de créer des bijoux qui sont aussi éthiques et écoresponsables que possible. Nous croyons qu’il est essentiel de connaître la provenance des diamants que nous utilisons et c’est pourquoi nous nous approvisionnons chez des fournisseurs qui peuvent garantir la traçabilité de la pierre jusqu’à son pays d’origine. Vous souhaitez faire sertir un bijou ou une alliance d’un diamant canadien? Nous vous invitons alors à jeter un coup d’œil au compte Instagram de notre fournisseur, Dream Diam. Si vous tombez sous le charme de l’une de leurs pierres, faites-le-nous savoir. Votre coup de cœur sera le point de départ idéal afin de créer une alliance sur mesure qui saura vous plaire.

   1. Leblanc, Pierre. « Homegrown Success. » Jewellery Business. Juillet 2017, pp. 88–90.

Ethical Engagement Rings: #CanadianDiamonds

“Where do you get your diamonds?” Clients ask us this all the time. It’s a loaded question, but a pertinent one, given the damage diamond mining can do to human beings and to the environment. That’s why we take alternative routes when acquiring precious stones.

If you were to fly over the Northwest Territories’ Diavik diamond mine, you would see an octagonal hole as big as an island, surrounded by cold, blue ocean. Its walls are tiered like stairs, as if you could simply stroll down to the Earth’s core and pluck your dream stone. Diavik, and other Canadian diamond mines, abide by strict regulations. They have funds in place to pay for the clean-up of the mine, they support several businesses owned by Indigenous peoples, and they work with surrounding communities to minimize the negative effect on the land and the people who live on it.1

Using Canadian diamonds is one of the ways we respond to our clients’ (as well as our own) desire to create jewellery that is as ethical and environmentally friendly as possible. It is important to us to know where our diamonds come from, so we work with suppliers that can trace their stones back to their source. If you’re interested in having a Canadian diamond as part of a ceremonial piece, have a look at Dream Diam, our Canadian diamond supplier. If you see something on their Instagram, let us know. We specialize in custom pieces, and a beloved stone is a great place to start the design process.

1. Leblanc, Pierre. “Homegrown Success.” Jewellery Business, July 2017, pp. 88–90.

Seedlings

As I pressed the soil around the delicate stems of my seedlings earlier this month, I thought about the importance of planting seeds in a business sense. So much is made of “networking,” a buzzword that’s been repeated in the corporate world so often that it sounds more like a frat boy chant than a serious business strategy. But unlike other buzzwords (such as synergy and optimization), networking actually has real worth. I prefer to think of it as a planting of seeds which involves the beginning, nurturing and eventual flourishing of a relationship.

A few years ago, I was challenged by a fellow artist to say exactly what it is I do. “Are you a blogger, an advertiser, a graphic designer, a social media strategist, or are you an artist?” he asked.  The truth is I am all of those things. The modern artist (if he or she wants to be self-sufficient or financially successful) has to be an entire company. Competition is intense, and unless you’re part of that minuscule group of artists who fall into a wealthy patron’s lap, you have to make success happen for yourself. And so I plant seeds. I travel to artisan fairs and art shows; I meet new gallerists, store-owners, stylists, and artists; and I always stay on the lookout for opportunities. But again, planting seeds is more than making a list of useful contacts. It’s about building a community of people who are trying to make something of themselves just like I am.

It was through planting seeds that I met the vendors, gallerists, and event organizers that have helped me get my body of work out there. And as I prepare for the launch of my third collection, I am thankful for all of the help, encouragement, and support that I have been lucky enough to enjoy. Those relationships set me up with my first exhibitions, and they got me into the art fairs that have become so vital to my business. So, in coordination with Marche Atelier Capitol, I will be unveiling SERIES 3 / MUTA / on March 20th and 21st.

Come celebrate with me. Maybe we'll plant a few seeds.

“I love art. It’s my imagination on the outside.”


That’s what Louise of the children’s book, “Louise Loves Art” says as she scribbles page after page of drawings in a tireless effort to create a masterpiece- which turns out to be an almost cubist portrait of a very naughty-looking cat. While my work rarely involves naughty cats, I can certainly relate to her art theory. 

Every piece of jewelry that I create starts with a sketch- a bit of imagination on the outside if you will. It’s the initial outpouring of ideas that I organize on the page in conference with my client, translating his or her wishes and style into the perfect design.

Wearing jewelry is a very personal expression of self, so whenever I meet a client, I take a moment to assess those choices. Is he or she subdued and reserved, or scattered and eccentric? Flashy and ostentatious in all the right ways? Whoever he or she is, my goal is to create the piece that will fit his or her personality, even if it takes me a thousand sketches to finesse. These are the working sketches. They are quick translations of my impressions, and there are tons and tons of them begging to be made. I edit, start over, tweak, start over again, and combine to come up with a series of options that I’d be proud to show to my client.

 

 

ONCE THE CLIENT APPROVES A DESIGN, THE TECHNICAL STUFF COMES INTO PLAY. THE DIMENSIONS, SIZES, SCALE, AND MATERIAL ARE DECIDED IN COMMUNICATION WITH MY CLIENT, CHANGING AND ADAPTING ALONG THE WAY. FINALLY I HAVE THE SKETCH THAT DISPLAYS THE PIECE-TO-BE FROM EVERY ANGLE, AND FINALLY I CAN GET MY HANDS DIRTY. IT CAN TAKE UP TO FOUR WEEKS TO CRAFT FINISH THE PIECE, AND WHEN IT’S DONE IT’S INCREDIBLY SATISFYING TO LOOK BACK ON THAT ORIGINAL SKETCH, AND MARVEL AT THE PROCESS.